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Document Type
Working Papers
Publication Topic(s)
Infant and Child Mortality, Maternal Health
Country(s)
Myanmar
Survey
Myanmar DHS, 2015-16
Language
English
Recommended Citation
Tai, Nyaung, Su Hlaing Tin Htut, and Thiri Swe. 2019. Impact of Use of Health Care on Under-5 Child Mortality among States and Regions: Analysis of the 2015-16 Myanmar Demographic and Health Survey.DHS Working Papers No. 147. Rockville, Maryland, USA: ICF.
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Publication ID
WP147

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Abstract:

This paper examines the impact of the health care services on under-5 mortality in Myanmar’s States and Regions. Reducing under-5 child mortality is the first target under Sustainable Development Goal 3. According to world health statistics, Myanmar is a low-income country in Southeastern Asia with high maternal deaths. In 2015, Myanmar had an under-5 mortality rate that was higher than the regional average. This research investigated the impact of health care services on under-5 mortality among Myanmar’s States and Regions by examining relevant socioeconomic and demographic factors from the first Myanmar Demographic and Health Survey (2015-16). It is possible that all factors examined in this study could affect the relationship between use of health care and under-5 mortality. All variables were included in the multivariate analysis, although only some variables had a statistically significant association with the outcome variable. The risk of child mortality was significantly higher for children of higher birth order (4-5: OR: 1.85; 95% CI: 1.01-3.38; p=0.048; 6 or more: OR: 2.11; 95% CI: 1.04-4.28; p=0.039). Children who received health services had a reduced risk of childhood death (OR: 0.06; 95% CI: 0.01-0.29; p=0.000) compared with children who did not. The risk of child mortality was significantly reduced for children whose mothers accessed antenatal care at a government hospital, private hospital, or mobile clinic (OR: 0.39; 95% CI: 1.06 -5.15; p=0.000). The study results highlight the determinants of under-5 child mortality among Myanmar’s States and Regions.