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Document Type
Working Papers
Publication Topic(s)
Maternal Health
Country(s)
Ethiopia
Language
English
Recommended Citation
Fekadu, Gedefaw A., Fentie A. Getahun, and Seblewongiel A. Kidanie. 2018. Facility Delivery and Postnatal Care Services Use among Mothers Who Attended Four or More Antenatal Care Visits in Ethiopia: Further Analysis of the 2016 Demographic and Health Survey. DHS Working Paper No. 137. Rockville, Maryland, USA: ICF.
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Publication ID
WP137

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Abstract:

In Ethiopia, many mothers who attend the recommended number of antenatal care visits fail to use facility delivery and postnatal care services. This study identifies factors associated with facility delivery and use of postnatal care among mothers who had four or more antenatal care visits, using data from the 2016 Ethiopian Demographic and Health Survey (EDHS). Methods To identify factors associated with facility delivery, we studied background and service-related characteristics among 2,415 mothers who attended four or more antenatal care visits for the most recent birth. In analyzing factors associated with postnatal care within 42 days after delivery, the study included 1,055 mothers who attended four or more antenatal care visits and delivered at home. We focused on women who delivered at home because women who deliver at a health facility are more likely also to receive postnatal care as well. A multivariable logistic regression model was fitted for each outcome to find significant associations between facility delivery and use of postnatal care. Results Fifty-six percent of women who had four or more antenatal care visits delivered at a health facility, while 44% delivered at home. Mothers with secondary or above level of education, urban residents, women in the richest wealth quintile, and women who were working at the time of interview had higher odds of delivering in a health facility. High birth order was associated with a lower likelihood of health facility delivery. Among women who delivered at home, only 8% received postnatal care within 42 days after delivery. Quality of antenatal care as measured by the content of care received during antenatal care visits stood out as an important factor that influences both facility delivery and postnatal care. Among mothers who attended four or more antenatal care visits and delivered at home, the content of care received during ANC visits was the only factor that showed a statistically significant association with receiving postnatal care. Conclusions The more antenatal care components a mother receives, the higher her probability of delivering at a health facility and of receiving postnatal care. The health care system needs to increase the quality of antenatal care provided to mothers because receiving more components of antenatal care is associated with increased health facility delivery and postnatal care. Further research is recommended to identify other reasons why many women do not use facility delivery and postnatal care services even after attending four or more antenatal care visits.