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Determinants of Early Introduction of Solid, Semi-Solid or Soft Foods among Infants Aged 3-5 Months in Four Anglophone West African Countries
Authors: Abukari I. Issaka, Kingsley E. Agho, Andrew N. Page, Penelope Burns, Garry J. Stevens, and Michael J. Dibley
Source: Nutrients, 6(7): 2602–2618; DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/nu6072602
Topic(s): Breastfeeding
Children under five
Nutrition
Country: Africa
   Multiple African Countries
Published: JUL 2014
Abstract: This study was conducted to explore and identify factors associated with the practice of early introduction of solid, semi-solid or soft foods among infants aged 3-5 months in four Anglophone West African countries. Data sources for the analyses were the latest Demographic and Health Survey datasets of the 4 countries, namely Ghana (GDHS, 2008), Liberia (LDHS, 2007), Nigeria (NDHS, 2013) and Sierra Leone (SLDHS, 2008). Multiple logistic regression methods were used to analyze the factors associated with early introduction of solid, semi-solid or soft foods among infants aged 3-5 months, using individual-, household- and community-level determinants. The sample consisted of 2447 infants aged 3-5 months from four Anglophone West African countries: 166 in Ghana, 263 in Liberia, 1658 in Nigeria and 360 in Sierra Leone. Multivariable analyses revealed the individual factors associated with early introduction of solid, semi-solid or soft foods in these countries. These included increased infant's age, diarrhea, acute respiratory infection and newborns perceived to be small by their mothers. Other predictors of early introduction of solid, semi-solid or soft foods were: mothers with no schooling, young mothers and fathers who worked in an agricultural industry. Public health interventions to improve exclusive breastfeeding practices by discouraging early introduction of solid, semi-solid or soft foods are needed in all 4 countries, targeting especially mothers at risk of introducing solid foods to their infants early.
Web: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4113759/