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The influence of women empowerment on maternal and childcare use in Nigeria
Authors: Rolle Remi Ahuru
Source: International Journal of Healthcare Management, Published online; DOI: 10.1080/20479700.2019.1688505
Topic(s): Antenatal care
Delivery care
Health care utilization
Immunization
Maternal health
Reproductive health
Women’s empowerment
Country: Africa
  Nigeria
Published: NOV 2019
Abstract: The influence of women empowerment on maternal and childcare use is sparsely research using Nigeria’s data. This study examined the influence of women empowerment and selected socio-demographic factors on maternal and childcare use in Nigeria. The study is cross-sectional and utilized data for 8,006 women drawn from the 2013 National Demographic and Health Survey. Descriptive and predictive analyses were undertaken to assess the prevalence of ANC, place of delivery and complete child immunization. The odds for utilizing the three indicators were estimated using multivariate binary logistic regression. The data revealed that 59% of the women made up to four ANC visits, 53% had their deliveries in health facilities and 26% undertook complete child immunization. Various indicators of women autonomy significantly influenced the three health indicators. The findings of the study have implications for both policy making and healthcare practice. It indicated that policies should be implemented in Nigeria that have the potentials to address social gender disparity and economically empower women. Healthcare practitioners should deploy the approaches of couple counselling and establishment of male-friendly maternity clinics as effective tools to integrate married men into women’s reproductive health concerns. KEYWORDS: Influence, women empowerment, education, maternal care, childcare, and Nigeria ABSTRACT The influence of women empowerment on maternal and childcare use is sparsely research using Nigeria’s data. This study examined the influence of women empowerment and selected socio-demographic factors on maternal and childcare use in Nigeria. The study is cross-sectional and utilized data for 8,006 women drawn from the 2013 National Demographic and Health Survey. Descriptive and predictive analyses were undertaken to assess the prevalence of ANC, place of delivery and complete child immunization. The odds for utilizing the three indicators were estimated using multivariate binary logistic regression. The data revealed that 59% of the women made up to four ANC visits, 53% had their deliveries in health facilities and 26% undertook complete child immunization. Various indicators of women autonomy significantly influenced the three health indicators. The findings of the study have implications for both policy making and healthcare practice. It indicated that policies should be implemented in Nigeria that have the potentials to address social gender disparity and economically empower women. Healthcare practitioners should deploy the approaches of couple counselling and establishment of male-friendly maternity clinics as effective tools to integrate married men into women’s reproductive health concerns. KEYWORDS: Influence, women empowerment, education, maternal care, childcare, and Nigeria